Parameswara Becomes King of Singapura

Parameswara
Parameswara
Parameswara
Parameswara

Last Ruler of Singapura

A chief from Palembang who escaped to Singapore after a failed revolt and establishes himself as King of Singapura.

Explore

Last Ruler of Singapura

The death of the Sang Aji is unfortunate. A huge task is before me, but with the support of the Orang Laut and my people, I shall assume my new role as King of Singapura. This city will submit.
An Orang Laut
A Parameswara Supporter
Circa 1392
Just eight days ago, Parameswara, the Great Exempt
According to Portuguese apothecary Tomé Pires, Parameswara (a title for ‘the bravest man’ in the Palembang Javanese tongue) was the son of Sam Agi Palimbaao. Parameswara was a great knight and warlike. He was married to a niece of Batara Tamarill, the King of Java. When Parameswara realised how much power the union brought him and how influential he was in the neighbouring islands that were under his brother-in-law’s jurisdiction, he rose against the vassalage and called himself “the Great Exempt”.
, battled his brother-in-law, the King of Java, with only 6,000 men. Even though we were heavily outnumbered, Parameswara stood his ground to give us time to escape. Thanks to him, a thousand men and women managed to escaped in junks and lancharas to Singapura. He is worthy to be king!
Suggestions For You
The Last King: Parameswara or Iskandar Shah?
There are two main accounts about the last King of Singapura. The Sejarah Melayu identifies him as Iskandar Shah, while the Portuguese recorded him as Parameswara. Due to little evidence, it is difficult to determine the accuracy of either account.
Find out more
By the time Parameswara arrived in Singapura, the island was caught between two great regional powers: the Majapahit empire and the Kingdom of Ayutthaya. Both powers spread their influence throughout the region.
Find out more

Falsa Demora and the Orang Laut Conflicts

A Local Trader
A Local Trader

We can’t trade here anymore. The storms
Changing weather patterns discouraged ships from calling at Singapura’s port. Some Portuguese authors called the island falsa demora, which means a wrong or tricky place to stay. Carracks that were in the way of the monsoons, often sank when such intense tempests struck.
have made it difficult for ships to dock at Singapura. Even if we could, we might not survive the raids from pirates. It’s just not worth risking my livelihood and the lives of my men.
An Orang Laut
An Orang Laut
1396
You will be raided if you don’t know the right trading port to dock at. You should look out for Batu Berlayar
Batu Berlayar, or Sail Rock, was a large granite rock formation that rose from the water. The original rock was blown up in 1848 as it was deemed an obstruction to shipping, despite it being recorded that there were “old charts engraved upwards of 200 years ago”. According to author Charles Burton Buckley, who wrote An Anecdotal History of Old Times in Singapore, the rock had “been known to navigators for many hundreds of years”. Today, its replica stands in Labrador Park, marking the western entrance to Keppel Harbour.
, or what you Chinese call Long Ya Men in the Singapura settlements.

The End of the Singapura Kingdom

Parameswara
Parameswara
Parameswara
Parameswara

Last Ruler of Singapura

A chief from Palembang who escaped to Singapore after a failed revolt and establishes himself as King of Singapura.

Explore

Last Ruler of Singapura

The Singapura Kingdom has been destroyed! The Siamese arrived and burnt everything to the ground. I have come to a new land and this is where I shall build a new kingdom. Its fields are bountiful, and the rivers are clear and full of fish. Therefore, let this new land…
An Orang Laut
An Orang Laut
1397
My Lord, we have always gone wherever you have deemed the land to be adequate and good. It shall be our honour to call it our home too, and you, our King.
This website is optimised for 1280 x 800 resolution in Chrome 70, Safari 12, Firefox 63, and IE 11.
For the best viewing experience, please expand your window browser or press "Ctrl -" or "Command -".
For the best viewing experience, please rotate your device to portrait mode.